Parenting

The Best Parenting Books To Check Out

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Best Parenting Books to Check Out

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My sister (who doesn’t have kids yet, mind you) has been hassling me to read this book called Bringing Up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting. She said it’s a parenting game-changer.

Apparently the French are PERFECT at raising cute little croissant-eating geniuses who sleep through the night and are well-behaved. Also, the French love wine…so obviously, I trust their judgment.

After I finish reading my book club selection And the Mountains Echoed, I plan on finding out just what exactly is the secret of French mamas. Other than the wine-drinking. (I have already mastered that one.)

Since I’m on a kick to better my parenting for August’s Happiness Project, I also Googled other best parenting books that might be worth checking out.

Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy ChildThis book is a must-read when you are preparing to have kids. It tells you why sleep is important and how to ensure your kids get it. I recommend this to anyone having a baby.

Nurture Shock: New Thinking About Children. Is our generation being TOO nurturing with our kids? Should everybody really get a medal for participating? The authors of this book argue that “many of modern society’s strategies for nurturing children are in fact backfiring- because key twists in the science have been overlooked.” I think this sounds very intriguing!




Bringing Up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting. Update: I read and loved this book. The French are on to something!

Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys. Now that I have a son, I am curious about the best strategies to raise a boy to be both sensitive and strong. I grew up in a house full of girls, so I’m kind of at a loss here.

Free-Range Kids. A common incorrect theory floating around is that the world is more dangerous “nowadays.”
Crime data shows that this is simply not true. Leonore Skenazy encourages parents to trust their instincts and stop hovering. Let kids be kids! (Click on the link to read my full review of the book.)

Raising Confident Girls: 100 Tips For Parents And Teachers. I also have a daughter, and some of what I see with young girls today frightens me. How do you raise a girl to love her body, respect herself, and not be obsessed with beauty in the culture we live in? I’m hoping this book has some answers.

Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder. I LOVE the idea of this book- that kids really need to get back in touch with nature and the great outdoors. I remember play dates consisting of exploring in the woods behind a friend’s house for hours…not playing video games inside all afternoon. The author links this trend of playing indoors to rises in obesity, depression, and even Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD).




The Danish Way of Parenting. Denmark is known as the happiest country in the world, so it stands to reason that perhaps Danish parents are doing something right with their kids. I loved this book, because it gave practical ways to incorporate the Danish way of living into your own household.

How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk. I’d like to avoid the classic dialogue of: “How was your day at school?” “Fine.” Hopefully, that’s not too much to ask.

Peaceful Parent, Happy Kids. Great ideas from Dr. Laura Markham on how to minimize the yelling and anger in favor of peace and happiness. (Click on the link to read my full review of the book.)

Yell Less, Love More: How the Orange Rhino Mom Stopped Yelling at Her Kids– and How You Can Too. This book is a good tool if you want to challenge yourself to daily activities and homework to help curb your yelling. You have to be good with follow-through, though, for it to work.

The Collapse of Parenting. “(Author Leonard) Sax argues that rising levels of obesity, depression, and anxiety among young people—as well as the explosion in prescribing psychiatric medications to kids—can all be traced to parents letting their kids call the shots.” An interesting theory, to say the least. Worth the read.

Have you read any good (or bad) parenting books that you’d like to share? I will definitely be passing on my reviews of any books I read!

 

 

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  • Elizabeth
    August 13, 2013 at 8:46 AM

    I read Becoming a Calm Mom to help me cope with my anxiety during those first few emotional, hormonal months. It was pretty helpful and at least made me feel proactive, but it’s very limited in its scope.

    • The Naughty Mommy
      August 13, 2013 at 1:32 PM

      I think that book actually sounds perfect for me. I’ll have to check it out!

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