Food, Healthy-ish

Day 1: Fed Up Challenge

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10 Day No Sugar Diet Day 1

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I survived Day 1 of the Fed Up (No Added Sugars for 10 Days) Challenge, mainly due to a loophole I discovered yesterday afternoon.

WINE IS ALLOWED! I repeat, you are allowed to drink wine on this challenge! 

You are only prohibited from having foods with added sugars, therefore, wine is perfectly acceptable. Hooray! Thank you to my friend Marla for pointing this out to me. 

Here’s what I ate yesterday…

Breakfast: Oatmeal made with whole milk, butter, and salt. Coffee w/ half-and-half. Water.

Lunch: Toasted Ezekiel bread with mashed avocado and red pepper flakes. Peanuts. Leftover roasted potatoes and carrots from dinner. More water.

Dinner: Veggie Chow Mein. White wine. Water.

Snacks (throughout the day): Tostitos, sesame sticks, and pretzels. 

I had high expectations for dinner, but the recipe was a little bit very frustrating. It said to soak the rice noodles for 6-8 minutes, by which time they should be ready. 

Well, I guess all rice noodles are not created equal because mine required 25-30 minutes of soaking. So by that time, my veggies were all soggy. It turned out okay, but I learned a lesson– always check the instructions on individual ingredients in the recipe. 

The only foods that I really had to turn down yesterday were Cinnamon Swirl toast and chocolate-chip cookie bars that we made on Sunday. I had made the Cinnamon Swirl toast for my son and he didn’t eat it. (My instinct is to eat what the kids don’t eat before I make myself a whole other meal.)

This brings me to a partial failure from yesterday. I realized early on that I hadn’t planned enough no sugar added meals that my kids would eat. So when my daughter saw the Cinnamon Swirl bread in the cabinet and asked for toast, I just said “yes.” 

Then I was making her lunch for daycare and I realized that everything I usually pack for her has added sugar. So she got PBJ on crackers, like usual. And one of the chocolate-chip cookie bars. Oops!

So I will try to serve them meals with no sugar added for these 10 days, but I think it will be more of a long-term process to swap out our “go-to” lunches and snacks with more suitable replacements. Although I don’t know if there will ever be a sugar-free replacement for a PBJ, right?

We are done with juice, though…which cuts out between 20-30 grams of sugar in their diets each day (and that’s just from one glass of either the Tropicana with Calcium or Ocean Spray Cran-Apple that I used to give them). 

Back to my own eating, I kind of feel like being allowed to have wine makes this challenge sort of lame. But now I have learned that there are all sorts of sugar free challenges. There are ones like this one, the Fed Up Challenge, that focus on no added sugars to make you realize how there is sugar in things you never imagined and it all adds up throughout the day.

And then there are sugar free challenges that are actually no sugar at all, meaning NO WINE and no fruits that have sugar either. 

This makes me wonder whether I will even see a difference in my health/attitude/anything from just cutting out added sugars. I’d like to eventually try a strict NO SUGAR AT ALL detox. Just not right now. 

Baby steps…

Anyone else trying this? How have you been doing? 

Keep reading about how I’m doing with the Fed Up Challenge…

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11 thoughts on “Day 1: Fed Up Challenge

  1. I think that’s wonderful! Cutting down on sugar, what are you replacing juice with for there school lunch, and at home? Just water? I don’t have kids yet, but I baby sit my nephew and niece, I always wonder how can remove so much juice from their diets and replace it with water? I like home made lemonade you can gauge the sugar content.

    1. Right now we are only giving them water and milk at home. At my daughter’s day care (she goes 2x a week), she gets a small cup of juice or water for her snack and lunch. Also, I’m sure my mom and my mother-in-law will still give them juice at their houses! I’m definitely still looking for a juice “replacement.” Was thinking of trying to make flavored water with fruit. Lemonade is a good idea!

  2. I think this is awesome that you’re doing this, and also involving your family in it too! Keep in mind, though, that from a biochemical perspective your body NEEDS some sugar to function. The synapses in your brain are largely formed from sugars and fats (albeit healthy versions of the two!), so to cut these out entirely by going on NO carb/NO sugar diets for extended periods of time can be very dangerous. Of course, lowering the levels of refined or added sugar we eat on a day to day basis is a fantastic idea. Just be careful about cutting the natural ones–like fruit and starchy veggies–out entirely 😉

  3. Sorry, but you did fue Challenge all wrong (with the wine, potato, pretzels, etc all that are not allow)

    1. Actually they are allowed, as specified by the Fed Up Challenge creators. I participated in a Facebook chat with the creators and they said that as long as the food had no ADDED SUGARS, it was allowed. He specifically said wine was okay! No added sugars in pretzels or potatoes either.

      1. if you are allowed the potatoes, pretzels, breads etc… it is NOT a true sugar detox…. ALL those elements turn to sugar as soon as they mix with saliva.

  4. Question…. how is it that you can eat all those grains… grains turn to sugar as soon as you put them into your mouth… that is where the digestion process begins…. and the saliva begins to work immediately converting them to sugar?

    1. The Fed Up Challenge, as I described, is a NO ADDED SUGARS challenge. The point being– there is added sugar in many food items you wouldn’t think. The challenge was in identifying those items and eliminating them.

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